About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
, in syria's civil war. what happened? >> that's right, wolf. syrian activists say at least 45 people were killed in two car bombings outside the capital of damascus. that city has been a sanctuary for pro-regime forced to flee their homes. the rebels have claimed to down three fighter jets in the past 24 hours. we'll speak with cnn's arwa damon from northern syria later this hour. a federal judge is ordering tobacco companies to publicly admit they deceived americans about the dangers of smoking. the court ruled big tobacco should print on the box and advertisements. it's not clear if tobacco companies will appeal this decision. and the self-described king of motivation has died at the age of 86 years old. zig ziglar best known for his seminars and more than two dozen books on salesmanship. he died in dallas after getting pneumonia. he had quite an influence. he had 30 books or so over the course of his life. >> quite a following. thanks very much, lisa, for that. >>> republican raise eyebrows when he said he might break the anti-tax pledge. that statement could also draw him into getting
uncertainty with egypt, uncertainty on its border with jordan, civil war in syria, probl problems with hezbollah and lebanon. not to mention iran. there's no port in the storm. this is now the new middle east. >> and richard, doesn't that make syria all the more important, you know, golan heights took mortar fire from syria, israel really doesn't want to get involved. you know, spread itself thin in syria, and i think that's why international action on syria is so important right now. >> it's one of the fault lines in the middle east. i think if you're an israeli, it's not the one at the moment that keeps you up at night the most. >> right. >> i still think the palestinian is the closest. then you've got egypt which is the anchor of israel's security. and i think actually the israelis are most worried about jordan. the israelis are not central to the dynamic in syria. syria which began as a civil war and spread into the proxy has the potential to become a regional war. just when the thought the middle east can get worse, it can. >> what's your assessment of pretty much the fact th
, the opportunity for this to flourish. all-around, our region, from syria these days to hezbollah, hamas in the recent weeks, and always iran in the background -- we see all of the region looking at the united states as a source of support and hope against the bad guys, whoever they are, all around the region. we are highly appreciative. we always keep the right to defend ourself by ourselves when it is needed, but i think the role of the united states is invaluable in our region. we are looking for -- we do not desire war. we pursue peace. but unfortunately the neighborhood is extremely tough. no place for the fainthearted. there is no second opportunity for those who cannot defend themselves, no mercy for the week. we see this daily in syria and in other corners. but we are determined to flourish in spite of all of these developments. we are determined to make israel stronger and more secure. we will always stretch one hand to look for any opportunity to knock on any door, open any window, to find a way to make peace. we will always be ready with -- ready to pull it if it becomes ultim
in 60 minutes n syria, two car bombs exploded in a town near damascus. the number of people wounded and killed is high and rising. at least 45 people, mostly civilians are reported dead. more than 100 injured. the bombs went off in a town known as a refuge for people forced from their homes by this civil war in syria. they weren't the only explosions. two bombs went off at the same time in a residential neighborhood in damascus. we don't know yet how many people are hurt or who is claiming responsibility. this is the wreckage of a syrian air force jet crashed and burning not far from aleppo. rebel fighters claim they shot it down and captured one of the pilots. this is amateur film. a cnn crew was just on the scene after the crash. rebels saying they also shot down a government helicopter yesterday. that captured on video. take a look. an opposition group posted its facebook page that the free syrian army brought down the helicopter with an anti aircraft weapon. we don't know what happened to the people who were actually on board that helicopter. we want to go straight to washington
displayed in the face of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engage with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they are not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are goin
, but neither do i see it as very helpful in pressing russia on issues like iran or their conduct towards syria. russian opposition level leaders, however, and russian civil society, and the russian press, what free press remains in russia today really support this legislation. and i think what this legislation intends is sort of a mutually beneficial relationship with russia based on a rule of law. based on human rights. that's the hope. it includes the sergei magnitsky legislation that came out of the foreign affairs committee of which i am an original co-sponsor, and i do think we owe a debt of gratitude to chairman ros-lehtinen for her determination to have that provision in the legislation. and i think if we reflect on the words of the russian opposition in their parliament, one said recently, this provision is very pro-russian. it helps defend us in russia from criminals. it helps defend us from criminals who kill our citizens, who steal our money, and hide it abroad. and that's the point. that's what we are trying to do with that provision. and this bill liberalizing trade while at the s
to your broader question republicans will continue to respect and follow his advice and syria is the next big issue that he is pounding away on. he was at a forum at the newseum yesterday and crying out for american leadership on syria which means more involvement and there are a lot of big issues he has a huge influence on because of his experience, respect and personal history. this issue i'm not so sure they'll follow him on but two or three have said they're putting holds on a nomination. no bell laureate economists nominated for the federal reserve who was finally withdrew his name after a year of waiting because he was not going to be -- >> consumer. >> and the consumer protection service agency, elizabeth warren's former agency so you have people all over the place, judges -- >> ambassadors. >> when lindsey graham mentioned yesterday was john boughten and that was, okay, a warning because john was not confirmed for u.n. ambassador then was a recess appointee. no way the president will nominate a secretary of state as a recess appointee. you cannot with credible lead diplomacy over
by jordan, egypt, lebanon, syria and iraq. but the fledgling country survived. the u.n. passed resolution 194 in december 1948 which allowed ref are geez who wished to live peacefully the right to return home at the earliest practical date. nearly 20 years later in 1967, israel pre 'em tifl struck egyptian forces after the access was blocked to the port. israel gained control over areas including the west bank and gaza strip and east jerusalem. for arabs, this was the beginning of a period of occupation by israel which remains at the center of today's conflict. now, there would be another air rob israeli war in 1973. before that, there's the formation of the plo or the palestinian liberation organization which would be defined by the likes of yasir arafat. in 1978, u.s. president jimmy carter helped to broker the peace accords between saadat of egypt and prime minister ba begin of israel which paved the way for the 1979 peace treaty between those two countries. the lalt '80s saw the formation of hamas in the west bank and gaza erasing hopes. the oslo accords signed -- establishing recogni
've got huge turmoil and revolution in this region. syria, iran, problems all over. but this issue here, and we're standing right here in jerusalem now between the israelis and the palestinians it remains of fundamental importance. >> for more reaction on the world's leaders, christiane amanpour joins us from new york. good to see you, of course, as always. you know, we know the president has a really complicated relationship with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and has not always been smooth sailing here. and it's no secret that he was rooting for mitt romney this go-around in the election. we've seen a statement from netanyahu. how has he responded? what kind of influence do you think the president has now in terms of dealing with him? >> well, mr. netanyahu, the prime minister, has sent a congratulations to president obama on his re-election and talking about secure and strong relationship between both countries and willingness to keep work with the united states president. on the issue tony blair was talking about, israeli/palestinian peace process, there's been no movemen
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)